AskDefine | Define lave

Dictionary Definition

lave

Verb

1 wash or flow against; "the waves laved the shore" [syn: lap, wash]
2 cleanse (one's body) with soap and water [syn: wash]
3 wash one's face and hands; "She freshened up in the bathroom" [syn: wash up]

User Contributed Dictionary

English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From lavare.

Verb

  1. To wash.
    • 1789, William Lisle Bowles, 'Sonnet I' from Fourteen Sonnets, 1789.
      the tranquil tide, / That laves the pebbled shore.
    • 2006, Cormac McCarthy, The Road, London: Picador, 2007, p. 38.
      The boy walked out and squatted and laved up the dark water.

Related terms

Etymology 2

lāf.

Noun

  1. The remainder; what is left.
    • 1885, Sir Richard Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Night 12.
      Then they set upon us and slew some of my slaves and put the lave to flight.

Danish

Verb

lave
  1. to make
  2. to prepare

French

Pronunciation

Noun

lave f

Verb form

lave
  1. first-, third-person singular indicative present of laver
  2. first-, third-person singular subjunctive present of laver
  3. second-person singular imperative of laver

Scots

Noun

  1. rest

Spanish

Verb form

lave
  1. first-, third-person singular subjunctive present of lavar
  2. third-person singular imperative of lavar

Swedish

Noun

lave c
  1. towerlike building atop a mine shaft

Extensive Definition

Lave was an ironclad floating battery of the French Navy during the 19th century. She was part of the Dévastation class of floating batteries.
In the 1850s, the British and French navies deployed iron-armoured floating batteries as a supplement to the wooden steam battlefleet in the Crimean War. The role of the battery was to assist unarmoured mortar and gunboats bombarding shore fortifications. The French used three of their ironclad batteries (Lave, Tonnante and Dévastation) in 1855 against the defences at the Battle of Kinburn (1855) on the Black Sea, where they were effective against Russian shore defences. They would later be used again during the Italian war in the Adriatic in 1859.
The ships were flat-bottommed, and commonly nicknamed "soapboxes". They were towed from France to Crimea to participate to the conflict. Lave was towed by Magellan.

Footnote

Synonyms, Antonyms and Related Words

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